Current Candy

Ohhhh

septagonstudios:

Michelle Eatough

septagonstudios:

Michelle Eatough

eschergirls:

anglingargot submitted:





This lovely pinup by Elias Chatzoudis caught my eye on the ECCC website, and I just had to go looking for the full image to see if it made any more sense. It didn’t. Good lord, Snow White, what was in that poisoned apple?

The apples are all the ones the evil queen dropped while she was running away screaming.

eschergirls:

anglingargot submitted:

This lovely pinup by Elias Chatzoudis caught my eye on the ECCC website, and I just had to go looking for the full image to see if it made any more sense. It didn’t. Good lord, Snow White, what was in that poisoned apple?

The apples are all the ones the evil queen dropped while she was running away screaming.

naturalhairdontcare:

See more “Inspired Hairstyles” on http://www.itsacurlsworld.com
Brown beauty, girl power, natural hair & more!
Instagram, Twitter & Tumblr: FarmaSarah

naturalhairdontcare:

See more “Inspired Hairstyles” on http://www.itsacurlsworld.com

Brown beauty, girl power, natural hair & more!

Instagram, Twitter & Tumblr: FarmaSarah

iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 

 former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

perel:

i do these when i dont know what to do

perel:

i do these when i dont know what to do

fordlibrarymuseum:

Jeanne Holm, Special Assistant for Women’s Affairs
President Ford appointed Jeanne Holm, Major General USAF (Retired), as Special Assistant to the President for Women on March 8, 1976. She succeeded Patricia S. Lindh, who had resigned to become Deputy Assistant Secretary of State.
 Jeanne Holm enlisted in the armed services during World War II and later became the first woman to attend the Air Command and Staff College. She went on attain the rank of Major General in the Air Force, and at the time of her retirement in June 1975 had the distinction of being the highest ranking woman ever to serve in the U.S. armed forces.As Special Assistant, Holm served as a liaison with women’s organizations and provided the President and White House staff members with advice on legislation, regulations, and executive orders. Her office also developed programs supporting women’s civil rights and encouraged recruitment of women for top-level government positions.

fordlibrarymuseum:

Jeanne Holm, Special Assistant for Women’s Affairs

President Ford appointed Jeanne Holm, Major General USAF (Retired), as Special Assistant to the President for Women on March 8, 1976. She succeeded Patricia S. Lindh, who had resigned to become Deputy Assistant Secretary of State.

Jeanne Holm enlisted in the armed services during World War II and later became the first woman to attend the Air Command and Staff College. She went on attain the rank of Major General in the Air Force, and at the time of her retirement in June 1975 had the distinction of being the highest ranking woman ever to serve in the U.S. armed forces.

As Special Assistant, Holm served as a liaison with women’s organizations and provided the President and White House staff members with advice on legislation, regulations, and executive orders. Her office also developed programs supporting women’s civil rights and encouraged recruitment of women for top-level government positions.

firecr0tch:

looz-y:

firecr0tch:

looz-y:

if you look up olaf you either get the snowman or the one who’s trying to kill three orphans for money

or both

http://31.media.tumblr.com/ecb9efae410940e5dee9e173a7fbd075/tumblr_mypjz9Y00J1roj9r0o1_1280.png

fuKCING CHRISYYTS

*whispers* do you wanna kill an orphan

angelophile:


You could argue comic books have little importance in the grander scheme of things. But comic books make a big statement in a small way. We won’t have blockbuster movies about a Muslim superhero until we can all be excited about a comic book portraying one. When Marvel created Khan, it took a shot at breaking the typical paradigm of superheroes. While it’s a small gesture when measured up to the entire comic book world, it’s another step in the movement for equality in entertainment.
For the larger part of the decade, there was a potent cloud of racism and hatred towards Muslim people. Today, the fact we can portray young Muslim girls as superheroes is a beacon of hope for what is to come. Sure, a lot of people will say “it’s just a comic book.” But I’d like to think somewhere out there, it’s making a difference in a young Muslim girl’s life. And even if the message gets lost and Khan’s character doesn’t sell well, at least a young girl could have her own superhero to look up to.

Global Thinking: Kamala Khan Marvel launches female Muslim Superhero by Kavahn Mansouri.

angelophile:

You could argue comic books have little importance in the grander scheme of things. But comic books make a big statement in a small way. We won’t have blockbuster movies about a Muslim superhero until we can all be excited about a comic book portraying one. When Marvel created Khan, it took a shot at breaking the typical paradigm of superheroes. While it’s a small gesture when measured up to the entire comic book world, it’s another step in the movement for equality in entertainment.

For the larger part of the decade, there was a potent cloud of racism and hatred towards Muslim people. Today, the fact we can portray young Muslim girls as superheroes is a beacon of hope for what is to come. Sure, a lot of people will say “it’s just a comic book.” But I’d like to think somewhere out there, it’s making a difference in a young Muslim girl’s life. And even if the message gets lost and Khan’s character doesn’t sell well, at least a young girl could have her own superhero to look up to.

Global Thinking: Kamala Khan Marvel launches female Muslim Superhero by Kavahn Mansouri.

tastefullyoffensive:

Guys With Fancy Lady Hair by Jessica Saia [via]

Previously: Men Pin-Ups